The Winkfield Walk

This is a description and report of the walk researched and walked by members of Bracknell U3A (and others!) It also appears in its rightful place on the “reports” section. It is here because we don’t have a detailed description of the route – for others to follow. If anyone could send these details to ian.clarkson@gmail.com he will be happy to post them.


We had a good turnout of 20 walkers – 16 from Bracknell U3A and 4 from other TVN U3A  groups.

The weather was reasonably kind being rather overcast and cold, but dry. The walk totalled about 3.5 miles and was led by David Fisher (Bracknell U3A).  Properties seen early on the route included:

Lambrook School – the house which later became Lambrook School was built by William BUDD  in 1853.  In 1860 a Robert BURNSIDE  who had a tutorial business in London purchased Lambrook and it then became a school which continues today.  Opposite the school isGrove Lodge – this substantial house has been occupied by many distinguished people including Lieutenant General Sir Henry KING 1776-1839, an Indian Army Officer and Member of Parliament for Sligo, and In the late 1880’s it was the home of the Admiral of the Fleet, the Hon Sir Henry Keppel.  During the Second World War it became the home of the 9 year old King Faisal of Iraq and his mother.

We then arrived at Maiden’s Green.  Rocque’s map of 1761 shows Maiden’s Green clearly populated around the crossroads and buildings that remain today include the house at Bailey’s Garage and the White Cottage. The early years of the house at Bailey’s Garagein the 18thC are a mystery.  However Kelly’s Directory names three ‘saddlers’ who occupied the house – Henry Caley (1854), Robert Poole (1883-1895) and George Bailey (1907).  By 1931 George Bailey’s trade had become ‘saddler and motor engineer’.  The site remains a garage to this day.  The White Cottage (now Winkfield House) – was built in the 1860’s, and it had become the local store by 1877 (Richard Phipps – grocer).

We then arrived at Maiden’s Green.  Rocque’s map of 1761 shows Maiden’s Green clearly populated around the crossroads and buildings that remain today include the house at Bailey’s Garage and the White Cottage. The early years of the house at Bailey’s Garagein the 18thC are a mystery.  However Kelly’s Directory names three ‘saddlers’ who occupied the house – Henry Caley (1854), Robert Poole (1883-1895) and George Bailey (1907).  By 1931 George Bailey’s trade had become ‘saddler and motor engineer’.  The site remains a garage to this day.  The White Cottage (now Winkfield House) – was built in the 1860’s, and it had become the local store by 1877 (Richard Phipps – grocer).

By the 1930’s Kelly’s records the shop being a grocers, drapers and post office.  It ceased being a post office in the 1970’s and more recently has been used as a tack shop. We visited the church of St Mary the Virgin which has seen many alterations over the years with the nave dating from the 13th century. One unusual feature is the columns supporting the Elizabethan roof, they are oak with one bearing a carving of a Tudor rose and the date 1592.  Opposite the church is the White Hart pub – formerly a Court Leet House which was a Manorial Court and dealt with petty offences. It stood on the old coaching route. In 1815 Eliza Agar, a widow, was the landlady

Our walk the continued south passing the site of Ascot Place which occupies a 400 acre site.  It was originally a Medieval Manor House owned by a Henry Bataille a forester of the Bailiwick of Ascot in 1339.  In 1726 it was bought by Andrew Lindegren who built a new house, “Ascot Place” in 1772.  Between 1773 and 1783 a grotto (Grade 1 Listed) was constructed.  In 1787 it was bought by Daniel Agace, a Huguenot Silk Merchant. In the 1860s it was owned by Rt.Hon. William Lidderdale, Governor of the Bank of England, followed by  Sir William Farmer in the 1890s who became Sherriff of the City of London and High Sherriff of Berkshire. In 1907 it was owned by Sir Harry Livesey, a racing driver.  It is now owned by the ruler of Abu Dhabi (£18 million in 1989).

Terry Dwyer

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